Posts Tagged ‘solutionism’

Learners are different, the argument goes, so learning paths will be different, too. And, the argument continues, if learners will benefit from individualized learning pathways, so instruction should be based around an analysis of the optimal learning pathways for individuals and tailored to match them. In previous posts, I have questioned whether such an analysis is meaningful or reliable and whether the tailoring leads to any measurable learning gains. In this post, I want to focus primarily on the analysis of learner differences.

Family / social background and previous educational experiences are obvious ways in which learners differ when they embark on any course of study. The way they impact on educational success is well researched and well established. Despite this research, there are some who disagree. For example, Dominic Cummings (former adviser to Michael Gove when he was UK Education minister and former campaign director of the pro-Brexit Vote Leave group) has argued  that genetic differences, especially in intelligence, account for more than 50% of the differences in educational achievement.

Cummings got his ideas from Robert Plomin , one of the world’s most cited living psychologists. Plomin, in a recent paper in Nature, ‘The New Genetics of Intelligence’ , argues that ‘intelligence is highly heritable and predicts important educational, occupational and health outcomes better than any other trait’. In an earlier paper, ‘Genetics affects choice of academic subjects as well as achievement’, Plomin and his co-authors argued that ‘choosing to do A-levels and the choice of subjects show substantial genetic influence, as does performance after two years studying the chosen subjects’. Environment matters, says Plomin , but it’s possible that genes matter more.

All of which leads us to the field known as ‘educational genomics’. In an article of breathless enthusiasm entitled ‘How genetics could help future learners unlock hidden potential’ , University of Sussex psychologist, Darya Gaysina, describes educational genomics as the use of ‘detailed information about the human genome – DNA variants – to identify their contribution to particular traits that are related to education [… ] it is thought that one day, educational genomics could enable educational organisations to create tailor-made curriculum programmes based on a pupil’s DNA profile’. It could, she writes, ‘enable schools to accommodate a variety of different learning styles – both well-worn and modern – suited to the individual needs of the learner [and] help society to take a decisive step towards the creation of an education system that plays on the advantages of genetic background. Rather than the current system, that penalises those individuals who do not fit the educational mould’.

The goal is not just personalized learning. It is ‘Personalized Precision Education’ where researchers ‘look for patterns in huge numbers of genetic factors that might explain behaviors and achievements in individuals. It also focuses on the ways that individuals’ genotypes and environments interact, or how other “epigenetic” factors impact on whether and how genes become active’. This will require huge amounts of ‘data gathering from learners and complex analysis to identify patterns across psychological, neural and genetic datasets’. Why not, suggests Darya Gaysina, use the same massive databases that are being used to identify health risks and to develop approaches to preventative medicine?

BG-for-educationIf I had a spare 100 Euros, I (or you) could buy Darya Gaysina’s book, ‘Behavioural Genetics for Education’ (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016) and, no doubt, I’d understand the science better as a result. There is much about the science that seems problematic, to say the least (e.g. the definition and measurement of intelligence, the lack of reference to other research that suggests academic success is linked to non-genetic factors), but it isn’t the science that concerns me most. It’s the ethics. I don’t share Gaysina’s optimism that ‘every child in the future could be given the opportunity to achieve their maximum potential’. Her utopianism is my fear of Gattaca-like dystopias. IQ testing, in its early days, promised something similarly wonderful, but look what became of that. When you already have reporting of educational genomics using terms like ‘dictate’, you have to fear for the future of Gaysina’s brave new world.

Futurism.pngEducational genomics could equally well lead to expectations of ‘certain levels of achievement from certain groups of children – perhaps from different socioeconomic or ethnic groups’ and you can be pretty sure it will lead to ‘companies with the means to assess students’ genetic identities [seeking] to create new marketplaces of products to sell to schools, educators and parents’. The very fact that people like Dominic Cummings (described by David Cameron as a ‘career psychopath’ ) have opted to jump on this particular bandwagon is, for me, more than enough cause for concern.

Underlying my doubts about educational genomics is a much broader concern. It’s the apparent belief of educational genomicists that science can provide technical solutions to educational problems. It’s called ‘solutionism’ and it doesn’t have a pretty history.

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A personalized language learning programme that is worth its name needs to offer a wide variety of paths to accommodate the varying interests, priorities, levels and preferred approaches to learning of the users of the programme. For this to be possible, a huge quantity of learning material is needed (Iwata et al., 2011: 1): the preparation and curation of this material is extremely time-consuming and expensive (despite the pittance that is paid to writers and editors). It’s not surprising, then, that a growing amount of research is being devoted to the exploration of ways of automatically generating language learning material. One area that has attracted a lot of attention is the learning of vocabulary.

Memrise screenshot 2Many simple vocabulary learning tasks are relatively simple to generate automatically. These include matching tasks of various kinds, such as the matching of words or phrases to meanings (either in English or the L1), pictures or collocations, as in many flashcard apps. Doing it well is rather harder: the definitions or translations have to be good and appropriate for learners of the level, the pictures need to be appropriate. If, as is often the case, the lexical items have come from a text or form part of a group of some kind, sense disambiguation software will be needed to ensure that the right meaning is being practised. Anyone who has used flashcard apps knows that the major problem is usually the quality of the content (whether it has been automatically generated or written by someone).

A further challenge is the generation of distractors. In the example here (from Memrise), the distractors have been so badly generated as to render the task more or less a complete waste of time. Distractors must, in some way, be viable alternatives (Smith et al., 2010) but still clearly wrong. That means they should normally be the same part of speech and true cognates should be avoided. Research into the automatic generation of distractors is well-advanced (see, for instance, Kumar at al., 2015) with Smith et al (2010), for example, using a very large corpus and various functions of Sketch Engine (the most well-known corpus query tool) to find collocates and other distractors. Their TEDDCLOG (Testing English with Data-Driven CLOze Generation) system produced distractors that were deemed acceptable 91% of the time. Whilst impressive, there is still a long way to go before human editing / rewriting is no longer needed.

One area that has attracted attention is, of course, tests, and some tasks, such as those in TOEFL (see image). Susanti et al (2015, 2017) were able, given a target word, to automatically generate a reading passage from web sources along with questions of the TOEFL kind. However, only about half of them were considered good enough to be used in actual tests. Again, that is some way off avoiding human intervention altogether, but the automatically generated texts and questions can greatly facilitate the work of human item writers.

toefl task

 

Other tools that might be useful include the University of Nottingham AWL (Academic Word List) Gapmaker . This allows users to type or paste in a text, from which items from the AWL are extracted and replaced as a gap. See the example below. It would, presumably, not be too difficult, to combine this approach with automatic distractor generation and to create multiple choice tasks.

Nottingham_AWL_Gapmaster

WordGapThere are a number of applications that offer the possibility of generating cloze tasks from texts selected by the user (learner or teacher). These have not always been designed with the language learner in mind but one that was is the Android app, WordGap (Knoop & Wilske, 2013). Described by its developers as a tool that ‘provides highly individualized exercises to support contextualized mobile vocabulary learning …. It matches the interests of the learner and increases the motivation to learn’. It may well do all that, but then again, perhaps not. As Knoop & Wilske acknowledge, it is only appropriate for adult, advanced learners and its value as a learning task is questionable. The target item that has been automatically selected is ‘novel’, a word that features in the list Oxford 2000 Keywords (as do all three distractors), and therefore ought to be well below the level of the users. Some people might find this fun, but, in terms of learning, they would probably be better off using an app that made instant look-up of words in the text possible.

More interesting, in my view, is TEDDCLOG (Smith et al., 2010), a system that, given a target learning item (here the focus is on collocations), trawls a large corpus to find the best sentence that illustrates it. ‘Good sentences’ were defined as those which were short (but not too short, or there is not enough useful context, begins with a capital letter and ends with a full stop, has a maximum of two commas; and otherwise contains only the 26 lowercase letters. It must be at a lexical and grammatical level that an intermediate level learner of English could be expected to understand. It must be well-formed and without too much superfluous material. All others were rejected. TEDDCLOG uses Sketch Engine’s GDEX function (Good Dictionary Example Extractor, Kilgarriff et al 2008) to do this.

My own interest in this area came about as a result of my work in the development of the Oxford Vocabulary Trainer . The app offers the possibility of studying both pre-determined lexical items (e.g. the vocabulary list of a coursebook that the learner is using) and free choice (any item could be activated and sent to a learning queue). In both cases, practice takes the form of sentences with the target item gapped. There are a range of hints and help options available to the learner, and feedback is both automatic and formative (i.e. if the supplied answer is not correct, hints are given to push the learner to do better on a second attempt). Leveraging some fairly heavy technology, we were able to achieve a fair amount of success in the automation of intelligent feedback, but what had, at first sight, seemed a lesser challenge – the generation of suitable ‘carrier sentences’, proved more difficult.

The sentences which ‘carry’ the gap should, ideally, be authentic: invented examples often ‘do not replicate the phraseology and collocational preferences of naturally-occurring text’ (Smith et al., 2010). The technology of corpus search tools should allow us to do a better job than human item writers. For that to be the case, we need not only good search tools but a good corpus … and some are better than others for the purposes of language learning. As Fenogenova & Kuzmenko (2016) discovered when using different corpora to automatically generate multiple choice vocabulary exercises, the British Academic Written English corpus (BAWE) was almost 50% more useful than the British National Corpus (BNC). In the development of the Oxford Vocabulary Trainer, we thought we had the best corpus we could get our hands on – the tagged corpus used for the production of the Oxford suite of dictionaries. We could, in addition and when necessary, turn to other corpora, including the BAWE and the BNC. Our requirements for acceptable carrier sentences were similar to those of Smith et al (2010), but were considerably more stringent.

To cut quite a long story short, we learnt fairly quickly that we simply couldn’t automate the generation of carrier sentences with sufficient consistency or reliability. As with some of the other examples discussed in this post, we were able to use the technology to help the writers in their work. We also learnt (rather belatedly, it has to be admitted) that we were trying to find technological solutions to problems that we hadn’t adequately analysed at the start. We hadn’t, for example, given sufficient thought to learner differences, especially the role of L1 (and other languages) in learning English. We hadn’t thought enough about the ‘messiness’ of either language or language learning. It’s possible, given enough resources, that we could have found ways of improving the algorithms, of leveraging other tools, or of deploying additional databases (especially learner corpora) in our quest for a personalised vocabulary learning system. But, in the end, it became clear to me that we were only nibbling at the problem of vocabulary learning. Deliberate learning of vocabulary may be an important part of acquiring a language, but it remains only a relatively small part. Technology may be able to help us in a variety of ways (and much more so in testing than learning), but the dreams of the data scientists (who wrote much of the research cited here) are likely to be short-lived. Experienced writers and editors of learning materials will be needed for the foreseeable future. And truly personalized vocabulary learning, fully supported by technology, will not be happening any time soon.

 

References

Fenogenova, A. & Kuzmenko, E. 2016. Automatic Generation of Lexical Exercises Available online at http://www.dialog-21.ru/media/3477/fenogenova.pdf

Iwata, T., Goto, T., Kojiri, T., Watanabe, T. & T. Yamada. 2011. ‘Automatic Generation of English Cloze Questions Based on Machine Learning’. NTT Technical Review Vol. 9 No. 10 Oct. 2011

Kilgarriff, A. et al. 2008. ‘GDEX: Automatically Finding Good Dictionary Examples in a Corpus.’ In E. Bernal and J. DeCesaris (eds.), Proceedings of the XIII EURALEX International Congress: Barcelona, 15-19 July 2008. Barcelona: l’Institut Universitari de Lingüística Aplicada (IULA) dela Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 425–432.

Knoop, S. & Wilske, S. 2013. ‘WordGap – Automatic generation of gap-filling vocabulary exercises for mobile learning’. Proceedings of the second workshop on NLP for computer-assisted language learning at NODALIDA 2013. NEALT Proceedings Series 17 / Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings 86: 39–47. Available online at http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp/086/004/ecp13086004.pdf

Kumar, G., Banchs, R.E. & D’Haro, L.F. 2015. ‘RevUP: Automatic Gap-Fill Question Generation from Educational Texts’. Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop on Innovative Use of NLP for Building Educational Applications, 2015, pp. 154–161, Denver, Colorado, June 4, Association for Computational Linguistics

Smith, S., Avinesh, P.V.S. & Kilgariff, A. 2010. ‘Gap-fill tests for Language Learners: Corpus-Driven Item Generation’. Proceedings of ICON-2010: 8th International Conference on Natural Language Processing, Macmillan Publishers, India. Available online at https://curve.coventry.ac.uk/open/file/2b755b39-a0fa-4171-b5ae-5d39568874e5/1/smithcomb2.pdf

Susanti, Y., Iida, R. & Tokunaga, T. 2015. ‘Automatic Generation of English Vocabulary Tests’. Proceedings of 7th International Conference on Computer Supported Education. Available online https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/aead/415c1e07803756902b859e8b6e47ce312d96.pdf

Susanti, Y., Tokunaga, T., Nishikawa, H. & H. Obari 2017. ‘Evaluation of automatically generated English vocabulary questions’ Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning 12 / 11

 

It’s a good time to be in Turkey if you have digital ELT products to sell. Not so good if you happen to be an English language learner. This post takes a look at both sides of the Turkish lira.

OUP, probably the most significant of the big ELT publishers in Turkey, recorded ‘an outstanding performance’ in the country in the last financial year, making it their 5th largest ELT market. OUP’s annual report for 2013 – 2014 describes the particularly strong demand for digital products and services, a demand which is now influencing OUP’s global strategy for digital resources. When asked about the future of ELT, Peter Marshall , Managing Director of OUP’s ELT Division, suggested that Turkey was a country that could point us in the direction of an answer to the question. Marshall and OUP will be hoping that OUP’s recently launched Digital Learning Platform (DLP) ‘for the global distribution of adult and secondary ELT materials’ will be an important part of that future, in Turkey and elsewhere. I can’t think of any good reason for doubting their belief.

tbl-ipad1OUP aren’t the only ones eagerly checking the pound-lira exchange rates. For the last year, CUP also reported ‘significant sales successes’ in Turkey in their annual report . For CUP, too, it was a year in which digital development has been ‘a top priority’. CUP’s Turkish success story has been primarily driven by a deal with Anadolu University (more about this below) to provide ‘a print and online solution to train 1.7 million students’ using their Touchstone course. This was the biggest single sale in CUP’s history and has inspired publishers, both within CUP and outside, to attempt to emulate the deal. The new blended products will, of course, be adaptive.

Just how big is the Turkish digital ELT pie? According to a 2014 report from Ambient Insight , revenues from digital ELT products reached $32.0 million in 2013. They are forecast to more than double to $72.6 million in 2018. This is a growth rate of 17.8%, a rate which is practically unbeatable in any large economy, and Turkey is the 17th largest economy in the world, according to World Bank statistics .

So, what makes Turkey special?

  • Turkey has a large and young population that is growing by about 1.4% each year, which is equivalent to approximately 1 million people. According to the Turkish Ministry of Education, there are currently about 5.5 million students enrolled in upper-secondary schools. Significant growth in numbers is certain.
  • Turkey is currently in the middle of a government-sponsored $990 million project to increase the level of English proficiency in schools. The government’s target is to position the country as one of the top ten global economies by 2023, the centenary of the Turkish Republic, and it believes that this position will be more reachable if it has a population with the requisite foreign language (i.e. English) skills. As part of this project, the government has begun to introduce English in the 1st grade (previously it was in the 4th grade).
  • The level of English in Turkey is famously low and has been described as a ‘national weakness’. In October/November 2011, the Turkish research institute SETA and the Turkish Ministry for Youth and Sports conducted a large survey across Turkey of 10,174 young citizens, aged 15 to 29. The result was sobering: 59 per cent of the young people said they “did not know any foreign language.” A recent British Council report (2013) found the competence level in English of most (90+%) students across Turkey was evidenced as rudimentary – even after 1000+ hours (estimated at end of Grade 12) of English classes. This is, of course, good news for vendors of English language learning / teaching materials.
  • Turkey has launched one of the world’s largest educational technology projects: the FATIH Project (The Movement to Enhance Opportunities and Improve Technology). One of its objectives is to provide tablets for every student between grades 5 and 12. At the same time, according to the Ambient report , the intention is to ‘replace all print-based textbooks with digital content (both eTextbooks and online courses).’
  • Purchasing power in Turkey is concentrated in a relatively small number of hands, with the government as the most important player. Institutions are often very large. Anadolu University, for example, is the second largest university in the world, with over 2 million students, most of whom are studying in virtual classrooms. There are two important consequences of this. Firstly, it makes scalable, big-data-driven LMS-delivered courses with adaptive software a more attractive proposition to purchasers. Secondly, it facilitates the B2B sales model that is now preferred by vendors (including the big ELT publishers).
  • Turkey also has a ‘burgeoning private education sector’, according to Peter Marshall, and a thriving English language school industry. According to Ambient ‘commercial English language learning in Turkey is a $400 million industry with over 600 private schools across the country’. Many of these are grouped into large chains (see the bullet point above).
  • Turkey is also ‘in the vanguard of the adoption of educational technology in ELT’, according to Peter Marshall. With 36 million internet users, the 5th largest internet population in Europe, and the 3rd highest online engagement in Europe, measured by time spent online, (reported by Sina Afra ), the country’s enthusiasm for educational technology is not surprising. Ambient reports that ‘the growth rate for mobile English educational apps is 27.3%’. This enthusiasm is reflected in Turkey’s thriving ELT conference scene. The most popular conference themes and conference presentations are concerned with edtech. A keynote speech by Esat Uğurlu at the ISTEK schools 3rd international ELT conference at Yeditepe in April 2013 gives a flavour of the current interests. The talk was entitled ‘E-Learning: There is nothing to be afraid of and plenty to discover’.

All of the above makes Turkey a good place to be if you’re selling digital ELT products, even though the competition is pretty fierce. If your product isn’t adaptive, personalized and gamified, you may as well not bother.

What impact will all this have on Turkey’s English language learners? A report co-produced by TEPAV (the Economic Policy Research Foundation of Turkey) and the British Council in November 2013 suggests some of the answers, at least in the school population. The report  is entitled ‘Turkey National Needs Assessment of State School English Language Teaching’ and its Executive Summary is brutally frank in its analysis of the low achievements in English language learning in the country. It states:

The teaching of English as a subject and not a language of communication was observed in all schools visited. This grammar-based approach was identified as the first of five main factors that, in the opinion of this report, lead to the failure of Turkish students to speak/ understand English on graduation from High School, despite having received an estimated 1000+ hours of classroom instruction.

In all classes observed, students fail to learn how to communicate and function independently in English. Instead, the present teacher-centric, classroom practice focuses on students learning how to answer teachers’ questions (where there is only one, textbook-type ‘right’ answer), how to complete written exercises in a textbook, and how to pass a grammar-based test. Thus grammar-based exams/grammar tests (with right/wrong answers) drive the teaching and learning process from Grade 4 onwards. This type of classroom practice dominates all English lessons and is presented as the second causal factor with respect to the failure of Turkish students to speak/understand English.

The problem, in other words, is the curriculum and the teaching. In its recommendations, the report makes this crystal clear. Priority needs to be given to developing a revised curriculum and ‘a comprehensive and sustainable system of in-service teacher training for English teachers’. Curriculum renewal and programmes of teacher training / development are the necessary prerequisites for the successful implementation of a programme of educational digitalization. Unfortunately, research has shown again and again that these take a long time and outcomes are difficult to predict in advance.

By going for digitalization first, Turkey is taking a huge risk. What LMSs, adaptive software and most apps do best is the teaching of language knowledge (grammar and vocabulary), not the provision of opportunities for communicative practice (for which there is currently no shortage of opportunity … it is just that these opportunities are not being taken). There is a real danger, therefore, that the technology will push learning priorities in precisely the opposite direction to that which is needed. Without significant investments in curriculum reform and teacher training, how likely is it that the transmission-oriented culture of English language teaching and learning will change?

Even if the money for curriculum reform and teacher training were found, it is also highly unlikely that effective country-wide approaches to blended learning for English would develop before the current generation of tablets and their accompanying content become obsolete.

Sadly, the probability is, once more, that educational technology will be a problem-changer, even a problem-magnifier, rather than a problem-solver. I’d love to be wrong.

(This post was originally published at eltjam.)

learning_teaching_ngramWe now have young learners and very young learners, learner differences and learner profiles, learning styles, learner training, learner independence and autonomy, learning technologies, life-long learning, learning management systems, virtual learning environments, learning outcomes, learning analytics and adaptive learning. Much, but not perhaps all, of this is to the good, but it’s easy to forget that it wasn’t always like this.

The rise in the use of the terms ‘learner’ and ‘learning’ can be seen in policy documents, educational research and everyday speech, and it really got going in the mid 1980s[1]. Duncan Hunter and Richard Smith[2] have identified a similar trend in ELT after analysing a corpus of articles from the English Language Teaching Journal. They found that ‘learner’ had risen to near the top of the key-word pile in the mid 1980s, but had been practically invisible 15 years previously. Accompanying this rise has been a relative decline of words like ‘teacher’, ‘teaching’, ‘pupil’ and, even, ‘education’. Gert Biesta has described this shift in discourse as a ‘new language of learning’ and the ‘learnification of education’.

It’s not hard to see the positive side of this change in focus towards the ‘learner’ and away from the syllabus, the teachers and the institution in which the ‘learning’ takes place. We can, perhaps, be proud of our preference for learner-centred approaches over teacher-centred ones. We can see something liberating (for our students) in the change of language that we use. But, as Bingham and Biesta[3] have pointed out, this gain is also a loss.

The language of ‘learners’ and ‘learning’ focusses our attention on process – how something is learnt. This was a much-needed corrective after an uninterrupted history of focussing on end-products, but the corollary is that it has become very easy to forget not only about the content of language learning, but also its purposes and the social relationships through which it takes place.

There has been some recent debate about the content of language learning, most notably in the work of the English as a Lingua Franca scholars. But there has been much more attention paid to the measurement of the learners’ acquisition of that content (through the use of tools like the Pearson Global Scale of English). There is a growing focus on ‘granularized’ content – lists of words and structures, and to a lesser extent language skills, that can be easily measured. It looks as though other things that we might want our students to be learning – critical thinking skills and intercultural competence, for example – are being sidelined.

More significant is the neglect of the purposes of language learning. The discourse of ELT is massively dominated by the paying sector of private language schools and semi-privatised universities. In these contexts, questions of purpose are not, perhaps, terribly important, as the whole point of the enterprise can be assumed to be primarily instrumental. But the vast majority of English language learners around the world are studying in state-funded institutions as part of a broader educational programme, which is as much social and political as it is to do with ‘learning’. The ultimate point of English lessons in these contexts is usually stated in much broader terms. The Council of Europe’s Common European Framework of Reference, for example, states that the ultimate point of the document is to facilitate better intercultural understanding. It is very easy to forget this when we are caught up in the business of levels and scales and measuring learning outcomes.

Lastly, a focus on ‘learners’ and ‘learning’ distracts attention away from the social roles that are enacted in classrooms. 25 years ago, Henry Widdowson[4] pointed out that there are two quite different kinds of role. The first of these is concerned with occupation (student / pupil vs teacher / master / mistress) and is identifying. The second (the learning role) is actually incidental and cannot be guaranteed. He reminds us that the success of the language learning / teaching enterprise depends on ‘recognizing and resolving the difficulties inherent in the dual functioning of roles in the classroom encounter’[5]. Again, this may not matter too much in the private sector, but, elsewhere, any attempt to tackle the learning / teaching conundrum through an exclusive focus on learning processes is unlikely to succeed.

The ‘learnification’ of education has been accompanied by two related developments: the casting of language learners as consumers of a ‘learning experience’ and the rise of digital technologies in education. For reasons of space, I will limit myself to commenting on the second of these[6]. Research by Geir Haugsbakk and Yngve Nordkvelle[7] has documented a clear and critical link between the new ‘language of learning’ and the rhetoric of edtech advocacy. These researchers suggest that these discourses are mutually reinforcing, that both contribute to the casting of the ‘learner’ as a consumer, and that the coupling of learning and digital tools is often purely rhetorical.

One of the net results of ‘learnification’ is the transformation of education into a technical or technological problem to be solved. It suggests, wrongly, that approaches to education can be derived purely from theories of learning. By adopting an ahistorical and apolitical standpoint, it hides ‘the complex nexus of political and economic power and resources that lies behind a considerable amount of curriculum organization and selection’[8]. The very real danger, as Biesta[9] has observed, is that ‘if we fail to engage with the question of good education head-on – there is a real risk that data, statistics and league tables will do the decision-making for us’.

[1] 2004 Biesta, G.J.J. ‘Against learning. Reclaiming a language for education in an age of learning’ Nordisk Pedagogik 24 (1), 70-82 & 2010 Biesta, G.J.J. Good Education in an Age of Measurement (Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers)

[2] 2012 Hunter, D. & R. Smith ‘Unpackaging the past: ‘CLT’ through ELTJ keywords’ ELTJ 66/4 430-439

[3] 2010 Bingham, C. & Biesta, G.J.J. Jacques Rancière: Education, Truth, Emancipation (London: Continuum) 134

[4] 1990 Widdowson, H.G. Aspects of Language Teaching (Oxford: OUP) 182 ff

[5] 1987 Widdowson, H.G. ‘The roles of teacher and learner’ ELTJ 41/2

[6] A compelling account of the way that students have become ‘consumers’ can be found in 2013 Williams, J. Consuming Higher Education (London: Bloomsbury)

[7] 2007 Haugsbakk, G. & Nordkvelle, Y. ‘The Rhetoric of ICT and the New Language of Learning: a critical analysis of the use of ICT in the curricular field’ European Educational Research Journal 6/1 1 – 12

[8] 2004 Apple, M. W. Ideology and Curriculum 3rd edition (New York: Routledge) 28

[9] 2010 Biesta, G.J.J. Good Education in an Age of Measurement (Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers) 27

 

 

I already mentioned Evgeny Morozov’s To Save Everything, Click Here when I discussed his idea of ‘solutionism’. Even if you don’t agree with everything he writes, he is always interesting to read. In a recent review article for the New York Times he looks at two new books, The Naked Future: What Happens in a World That Anticipates Your Every Move? by Patrick Tucker, and Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread — The Lessons From a New Science by Alex Pentland.

Morozov takes a critical, philosophical look at the way that big data might impact on our lives, and the article is well worth a read. For an entertaining fictional take on Big Data, Dave Eggers’ dystopia, The Circle, is a novel worth packing in your suitcase next time you have to go somewhere.

dave_eggers_the_circle_large_verge_medium_landscape

morozov

The drive towards adaptive learning is being fuelled less by individual learners or teachers than it is by commercial interests, large educational institutions and even larger agencies, including national governments. How one feels about adaptive learning is likely to be shaped by one’s beliefs about how education should be managed.

Huge amounts of money are at stake. Education is ‘a global marketplace that is estimated conservatively to be worth in excess of $5 trillion per annum’ (Selwyn, Distrusting Educational Technology 2013, p.2). With an eye on this pot, in one year, 2012, ‘venture capital funds, private equity investors and transnational corporations like Pearson poured over $1.1 billion into education technology companies’[1] Knewton, just one of a number of adaptive learning companies, managed to raise $54 million before it signed multi-million dollar contracts with ELT publishers like Macmillan and Cambridge University Press. In ELT, some publishing companies are preferring to sit back and wait to see what happens. Most, however, have their sights firmly set on the earnings potential and are fully aware that late-starters may never be able to catch up with the pace-setters.

The nexus of vested interests that is driving the move towards adaptive learning is both tight and complicated. Fuller accounts of this can be found in Stephen Ball’s ‘Education Inc.’ (2012) and Joel Spring’s ‘Education Networks’ (2012) but for this post I hope that a few examples will suffice.

Leading the way is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the world’s largest private foundation with endowments of almost $40 billion. One of its activities is the ‘Adaptive Learning Market Acceleration Program’ which seeks to promote adaptive learning and claims that the adaptive learning loop can defeat the iron triangle of costs, quality and access (referred to in The Selling Points of Adaptive Learning, above). It is worth noting that this foundation has also funded Teach Plus, an organisation that has been lobbying US ‘state legislatures to eliminate protection of senior teachers during layoffs’ (Spring, 2012, p.51). It also supports the Foundation for Excellence in Education, ‘a major advocacy group for expanding online instruction by changing state laws’ (ibid., p.51). The chairman of this foundation is Jeb Bush, brother of ex-president Bush, who took the message of his foundation’s ‘Digital Learning Now!’ program on the road in 2011. The message, reports Spring (ibid. p.63) was simple: ‘the economic crises provided an opportunity to reduce school budgets by replacing teachers with online courses.’ The Foundation for Excellence in Education is also supported by the Walton Foundation (the Walmart family) and iQity, a company whose website makes clear its reasons for supporting Jeb Bush’s lobbying. ‘The iQity e-Learning Platform is the most complete solution available for the electronic search and delivery of curriculum, courses, and other learning objects. Delivering over one million courses each year, the iQity Platform is a proven success for students, teachers, school administrators, and district offices; as well as state, regional, and national education officials across the country.[2]

Another supporter of the Foundation for Excellence in Education is the Pearson Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Pearson. The Pearson Foundation, in its turn, is supported by the Gates Foundation. In 2011, the Pearson Foundation received funding from the Gates Foundation to create 24 online courses, four of which would be distributed free and the others sold by Pearson the publishers (Spring, 2012, p.66).

The campaign to promote online adaptive learning is massively funded and extremely well-articulated. It receives support from transnational agencies such as the World Bank, WTO and OECD, and its arguments are firmly rooted in the discourse ‘of international management consultancies and education businesses’ (Ball, 2012, p.11-12). It is in this context that observers like Neil Selwyn connect the growing use of digital technologies in education to the corporatisation and globalisation of education and neo-liberal ideology.

Adaptive learning also holds rich promise for those who can profit from the huge amount of data it will generate. Jose Fereira, CEO of Knewton, acknowledges that adaptive learning has ‘the capacity to produce a tremendous amount of data, more than maybe any other industry’[3]. He continues ‘Big data is going to impact education in a big way. It is inevitable. It has already begun. If you’re part of an education organization, you need to have a vision for how you will take advantage of big data. Wait too long and you’ll wake up to find that your competitors (and the instructors that use them) have left you behind with new capabilities and insights that seem almost magical.’ Rather paradoxically, he then concludes that ‘we must all commit to the principle that the data ultimately belong to the students and the schools’. It is not easy to understand how such data can be both the property of individuals and, at the same time, be used by educational organizations to gain competitive advantage.

The existence and exploitation of this data may also raise concerns about privacy. In the same way that many people do not fully understand the extent or purpose of ‘dataveillance’ by cookies when they are browsing the internet, students cannot be expected to fully grasp the extent or potential commercial use of the data that they generate when engaged in adaptive learning programs.

Selwyn (Distrusting Educational Technology 2013, p.59-60) highlights a further problem connected with the arrival of big data. ‘Dataveillance’, he writes, also ‘functions to decrease the influence of ‘human’ experience and judgement, with it no longer seeming to matter what a teacher may personally know about a student in the face of his or her ‘dashboard’ profile and aggregated tally of positive and negative ‘events’. As such, there would seem to be little room for ‘professional’ expertise or interpersonal emotion when faced with such data. In these terms, institutional technologies could be said to be both dehumanizing and deprofessionalizing the relationships between people in an education context – be they students, teachers, administrators or managers.’

Adaptive learning in online and blended programs may well offer a number of advantages, but these will need to be weighed against the replacement or deskilling of teachers, and the growing control of big business over educational processes and content. Does adaptive learning increase the risk of transforming language teaching into a digital diploma mill (Noble, Digital Diploma Mills: The automation of higher education 2002)?

Solutionism

Evgeney Morozov’s 2013 best-seller, ‘To Save Everything, Click Here’, takes issue with our current preoccupation with finding technological solutions to complex and contentious problems. If adaptive learning is being presented as a solution, what is the problem that it is the solution of? In Morosov’s analysis, it is not an educational problem. ‘Digital technologies might be a perfect solution to some problems,’ he writes, ‘but those problems don’t include education – not if by education we mean the development of the skills to think critically about any given issue’ (Morosov, 2013, p.8). Only if we conceive of education as the transmission of bits of information (and in the case of language education as the transmission of bits of linguistic information), could adaptive learning be seen as some sort of solution to an educational problem. The push towards adaptive learning in ELT can be seen, in Morosov’s terms, as reaching ‘for the answer before the questions have been fully asked’ (ibid., p.6).

The world of education has been particularly susceptible to the dreams of a ‘technical fix’. Its history, writes Neil Selwyn, ‘has been characterised by attempts to use the ‘power’ of technology in order to solve problems that are non-technological in nature. […] This faith in the technical fix is pervasive and relentless – especially in the minds of the key interests and opinion formers of this digital age. As the co-founder of the influential Wired magazine reasoned more recently, ‘tools and technology drive us. Even if a problem has been caused by technology, the answer will always be more technology’ (Selwyn, Education in a Digital World 2013, p.36).

Morosov cautions against solutionism in all fields of human activity, pointing out that, by the time a problem is ‘solved’, it becomes something else entirely. Anyone involved in language teaching would be well-advised to identify and prioritise the problems that matter to them before jumping to the conclusion that adaptive learning is the ‘solution’. Like other technologies, it might, just possibly, ‘reproduce, perpetuate, strengthen and deepen existing patterns of social relations and structures – albeit in different forms and guises. In this respect, then, it is perhaps best to approach educational technology as a ‘problem changer’ rather than a ‘problem solver’ (Selwyn, Education in a Digital World 2013, p.21).


[1] Philip McRae Rebirth of the Teaching Machine through the Seduction of Data Analytics: This time it’s personal April 14, 2013 http://philmcrae.com/2/post/2013/04/rebirth-of-the-teaching-maching-through-the-seduction-of-data-analytics-this-time-its-personal1.html (last accessed 13 January 2014)

[2] http://www.iq-ity.com/ (last accessed 13 January, 2014)

There is a good chance that many readers will have only the haziest idea of what adaptive learning is. There is a much better chance that most English language teachers, especially those working in post-secondary education, will feel the impact of adaptive learning on their professional lives in the next few years. According to Time magazine, it is a ‘hot concept, embraced by education reformers‘, which is ‘poised to reshape education’[1]. According to the educational news website, Education Dive, there is ‘no hotter segment in ed tech right now’[2]. All the major ELT publishers are moving away from traditional printed coursebooks towards the digital delivery of courses that will contain adaptive learning elements. Their investments in the technology are colossal. Universities in many countries, especially the US, are moving in the same direction, again with huge investments. National and regional governments, intergovernmental organisations (such as UNESCO, the OECD, the EU and the World Bank), big business and hugely influential private foundations (such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) are all lined up in support of the moves towards the digital delivery of education, which (1) will inevitably involve elements of adaptive learning, and (2) will inevitably impact massively on the world of English language teaching.

The next 13 posts will, together, form a guide to adaptive learning in ELT.

1 Introduction

2 Simple models of adaptive learning

3 Gamification

4 Big data, analytics and adaptive learning

5 Platforms and more complex adaptive learning systems

6 The selling points of adaptive learning

7 Ten predictions for the future

8 Theory, research and practice
9 Neo liberalism and solutionism
10 Learn more