Posts Tagged ‘translation’

Lingua.ly is an Israeli start-up which, in its own words, ‘is an innovative new learning solution that helps you learn a language from the open web’. Its platform ‘uses big-data paired with spaced repetition to help users bootstrap their way to fluency’. You can read more of this kind of adspeak at the Lingua.ly blog  or the Wikipedia entry  which seems to have been written by someone from the company.

How does it work? First of all, state the language you want to study (currently there are 10 available) and the language you already speak (currently there are 18 available). Then, there are three possible starting points: insert a word which you want to study, click on a word in any web text or click on a word in one of the suggested reading texts. This then brings up a bilingual dictionary entry which, depending on the word, will offer a number of parts of speech and a number of translated word senses. Click on the appropriate part of speech and the appropriate word sense, and the item will be added to your personal word list. Once you have a handful of words in your word list, you can begin practising these words. Here there are two options. The first is a spaced repetition flashcard system. It presents the target word and 8 different translations in your own language, and you have to click on the correct option. Like most flashcard apps, spaced repetition software determines when and how often you will be re-presented with the item.

The second option is to read an authentic web text which contains one or more of your target items. The company calls this ‘digital language immersion, a method of employing a virtual learning environment to simulate the language learning environment’. The app ‘relies on a number of applied linguistics principles, including the Natural Approach and Krashen’s Input Hypothesis’, according to the Wikipedia entry. Apparently, the more you use the app, the more it knows about you as a learner, and the better able it is to select texts that are appropriate for you. As you read these texts, of course, you can click on more words and add them to your word list.

I tried out Lingua.ly, logging on as a French speaker wanting to learn English, and clicking on words as the fancy took me. I soon had a selection of texts to read. Users are offered a topic menu which consisted of the following: arts, business, education, entertainment, food, weird, beginners, green, health, living, news, politics, psychology, religion, science, sports, style. The sources are varied and not at all bad – Christian Science Monitor, The Grauniad, Huffington Post, Time, for example –and there are many very recent articles. Some texts were interesting; others seemed very niche. I began clicking on more words that I thought would be interesting to explore and here my problems began.

I quickly discovered that the system could only deal with single words, so phrasal verbs were off limits. One text I looked at had the phrasal verb ‘ripping off’, and although I could get translations for ‘ripping’ and ‘off’, this was obviously not terribly helpful. Learners who don’t know the phrasal verb ‘ripped off’ do not necessarily know that it is a phrasal verb, so the translations offered for the two parts of the verb are worse than unhelpful; they are actually misleading. Proper nouns were also a problem, although some of the more common ones were recognised. But the system failed to recognise many proper nouns for what they were, and offered me translations of homonymous nouns. new_word_added_'ripping_off' With some words (e.g. ‘stablemate’), the dictionary offered only one translation (in this case, the literal translation), but not the translation (the much more common idiomatic one) that was needed in the context in which I came across the word. With others (e.g. ‘pertain’), I was offered a list of translations which included the one that was appropriate in the context, but, unfortunately, this is the French word ‘porter’, which has so many possible meanings that, if you genuinely didn’t know the word, you would be none the wiser.

Once you’ve clicked on an appropriate part of speech and translation (if you can find one), the dictionary look-up function offers both photos and example sentences. Here again there were problems. I’d clicked on the verb ‘pan’ which I’d encountered in the context of a critic panning a book they’d read. I was able to select an appropriate translation, but when I got to the photos, I was offered only multiple pictures of frying pans. There were no example sentences for my meaning of ‘pan’: instead, I was offered multiple sentences about cooking pans, and one about Peter Pan. In other cases, the example sentences were either unhelpful (e.g. the example for ‘deal’ was ‘I deal with that’) or bizarre (e.g. the example sentence for ‘deemed’ was ‘The boy deemed that he cheated in the examination’). For some words, there were no example sentences at all.

Primed in this way, I was intrigued to see how the system would deal with the phrase ‘heaving bosoms’ which came up in one text. ‘Heaving bosoms’ is an interesting case. It’s a strong collocation, and, statistically, ‘heaving bosoms’ plural are much more frequent than ‘a heaving bosom’ singular. ‘Heaving’, as an adjective, only really collocates with ‘bosoms’. You don’t find ‘heaving’ collocating with any of the synonyms for ‘bosoms’. The phrase is also heavily connoted, strongly associated with romance novels, and often used with humorous intent. Finally, there is also a problem of usage with ‘bosom’ / ‘bosoms’: men or women, one or two – all in all, it’s a tricky word.

Lingua.ly was no help at all. There was no dictionary entry for an adjectival ‘heaving’, and the translations for the verb ‘heave’ were amusing, but less than appropriate. As for ‘bosom’, there were appropriate translations (‘sein’ and ‘poitrine’), but absolutely no help with how the word is actually used. Example sentences, which are clearly not tagged to the translation which has been chosen, included ‘Or whether he shall die in the bosom of his family or neglected and despised in a foreign land’ and ‘Can a man take fire in his bosom, and his clothes not be burned?’

Lingua.ly has a number of problems. First off, its software hinges on a dictionary (it’s a Babylon dictionary) which can only deal with single words, is incomplete, and does not deal with collocation, connotation, style or register. As such, it can only be of limited value for receptive use, and of no value whatsoever for productive use. Secondly, the web corpus that it is using simply isn’t big enough. Thirdly, it doesn’t seem to have any Natural Language Processing tool which could enable it to deal with meanings in context. It can’t disambiguate words automatically. Such software does now exist, and Lingua.ly desperately needs it.

Unfortunately, there are other problems, too. The flashcard practice is very repetitive and soon becomes boring. With eight translations to choose from, you have to scroll down the page to see them all. But there’s a timer mechanism, and I frequently timed out before being able to select the correct translation (partly because words are presented with no context, so you have to remember the meaning which you clicked in an earlier study session). The texts do not seem to be graded for level. There is no indication of word frequency or word sense frequency. There is just one gamification element (a score card), but there is no indication of how scores are achieved. Last, but certainly not least, the system is buggy. My word list disappeared into the cloud earlier today, and has not been seen since.

I think it’s a pity that Lingua.ly is not better. The idea behind it is good – even if the references to Krashen are a little unfortunate. The company says that they have raised $800,000 in funding, but with their freemium model they’ll be desperately needing more, and they’ve gone to market too soon. One reviewer, Language Surfer,  wrote a withering review of Lingua.ly’s Arabic program (‘it will do more harm than good to the Arabic student’), and Brendan Wightman, commenting at eltjam,  called it ‘dull as dish water, […] still very crude, limited and replete with multiple flaws’. But, at least, it’s free.

There is a lot that technology can do to help English language learners develop their reading skills. The internet makes it possible for learners to read an almost limitless number of texts that will interest them, and these texts can evaluated for readability and, therefore, suitability for level (see here for a useful article). RSS opens up exciting possibilities for narrow reading and the positive impact of multimedia-enhanced texts was researched many years ago. There are good online bilingual dictionaries and other translation tools. There are apps that go with graded readers (see this review in the Guardian) and there are apps that can force you to read at a certain speed. And there is more. All of this could very effectively be managed on a good learning platform.

Could adaptive software add another valuable element to reading skills development?

Adaptive reading programs are spreading in the US in primary education, and, with some modifications, could be used in ELT courses for younger learners and for those who do not have the Roman alphabet. One of the most well-known has been developed by Lexia Learning®, a company that won a $500,000 grant from the Gates Foundation last year. Lexia Learning® was bought by Rosetta Stone® for $22.5 million in June 2013.

One of their products, Lexia Reading Core5, ‘provides explicit, systematic, personalized learning in the six areas of reading instruction, and delivers norm-referenced performance data and analysis without interrupting the flow of instruction to administer a test. Designed specifically to meet the Common Core and the most rigorous state standards, this research-proven, technology-based approach accelerates reading skills development, predicts students’ year-end performance and provides teachers data-driven action plans to help differentiate instruction’.

core5-ss-small

The predictable claim that it is ‘research-proven’ has not convinced everyone. Richard Allington, a professor of literacy studies at the University of Tennessee and a past president of both the International Reading Association and the National Reading Association, has said that all the companies that have developed this kind of software ‘come up with evidence – albeit potential evidence — that kids could improve their abilities to read by using their product. It’s all marketing. They’re selling a product. Lexia is one of these programs. But there virtually are no commercial programs that have any solid, reliable evidence that they improve reading achievement.’[1] He has argued that the $12 million that has been spent on the Lexia programs would have been better spent on a national program, developed at Ohio State University, that matches specially trained reading instructors with students known to have trouble learning to read.

But what about ELT? For an adaptive program like Lexia’s to work, reading skills need to be broken down in a similar way to the diagram shown above. Let’s get some folk linguistics out of the way first. The sub-skills of reading are not skimming, scanning, inferring meaning from context, etc. These are strategies that readers adopt voluntarily in order to understand a text better. If a reader uses these strategies in their own language, they are likely to transfer these strategies to their English reading. It seems that ELT instruction in strategy use has only limited impact, although this kind of training may be relevant to preparation for exams. This insight is taking a long time to filter down to course and coursebook design, but there really isn’t much debate[2]. Any adaptive ELT reading program that confuses reading strategies with reading sub-skills is going to have big problems.

What, then, are the sub-skills of reading? In what ways could reading be broken down into a skill tree so that it is amenable to adaptive learning? Researchers have provided different answers. Munby (1978), for example, listed 19 reading microskills, Heaton (1988) listed 14. However, a bigger problem is that other researchers (e.g. Lunzer 1979, Rost 1993) have failed to find evidence that distinct sub-skills actually exist. While it is easier to identify sub-skills for very low level readers (especially for those whose own language is very different from English), it is simply not possible to do so for higher levels.

Reading in another language is a complex process which involves both top-down and bottom-up strategies, is intimately linked to vocabulary knowledge and requires the activation of background, cultural knowledge. Reading ability, in the eyes of some researchers, is unitary or holistic. Others prefer to separate things into two components: word recognition and comprehension[3]. Either way, a consensus is beginning to emerge that teachers and learners might do better to focus on vocabulary extension (and this would include extensive reading) than to attempt to develop reading programs that assume the multidivisible nature of reading.

All of which means that adaptive learning software and reading skills in ELT are unlikely bedfellows. To be sure, an increased use of technology (as described in the first paragraph of this post) in reading work will generate a lot of data about learner behaviours. Analysis of this data may lead to actionable insights, and it may not! It will be interesting to find out.

 

[1] http://www.khi.org/news/2013/jun/17/budget-proviso-reading-program-raises-questions/

[2] See, for example, Walter, C. & M. Swan. 2008. ‘Teaching reading skills: mostly a waste of time?’ in Beaven, B. (ed.) IATEFL 2008 Exeter Conference Selections. (Canterbury: IATEFL). Or go back further to Alderson, J. C. 1984 ‘Reading in a foreign language: a reading problem or a language problem?’ in J.C. Alderson & A. H. Urquhart (eds.) Reading in a Foreign Language (London: Longman)

[3] For a useful summary of these issues, see ‘Reading abilities and strategies: a short introduction’ by Feng Liu (International Education Studies 3 / 3 August 2010) www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ies/article/viewFile/6790/5321

busuu is an online language learning service. I did not refer to it in the ‘guide’ because it does not seem to use any adaptive learning software yet, but this is set to change. According to founder Bernhard Niesner, the company is already working on incorporation of adaptive software.

A few statistics will show the significance of busuu. The site currently has over 40 million users (El Pais, 8 February 2014) and is growing by 40,000 a day. The basic service is free, but the premium service costs Euro 69.99 a year. The company will not give detailed user statistics, but say that ‘hundreds of thousands’ are paying for the premium service, that turnover was a 7-figure number last year and will rise to 8 figures this year.

It is easy to understand why traditional publishers might be worried about competition like busuu and why they are turning away from print-based courses.

Busuu offers 12 languages, but, as a translation-based service, any one of these languages can only be studied if you speak one of the other languages on offer. The levels of the different courses are tagged to the CEFR.

busuuframe

In some ways, busuu is not so different from competitors like duolingo. Students are presented with bilingual vocabulary sets, accompanied by pictures, which are tested in a variety of ways. As with duolingo, some of this is a little strange. For German at level A1, I did a vocabulary set on ‘pets’ which presented the German words for a ferret, a tortoise and a guinea-pig, among others. There are dialogues, which are both written and recorded, that are sometimes surreal.

Child: Mum, look over there, there’s a dog without a collar, can we take it?

Mother: No, darling, our house is too small to have a dog.

Child: Mum your bedroom is very big, it can sleep with dad and you.

Mother: Come on, I’ll buy you a toy dog.

The dialogues are followed up by multiple choice questions which test your memory of the dialogue. There are also writing exercises where you are given a picture from National Geographic and asked to write about it. It’s not always clear what one is supposed to write. What would you say about a photo that showed a large number of parachutes in the sky, beyond ‘I can see a lot of parachutes’?

There are also many gamification elements. There is a learning carrot where you can set your own learning targets and users can earn ‘busuuberries’ which can then be traded in for animations in a ‘language garden’.

2014-02-25_0911

But in one significant respect, busuu differs from its competitors. It combines the usual vocabulary, grammar and dialogue work with social networking. Users can interact with text or video, and feedback on written work comes from other users. My own experience with this was mixed, but the potential is clear. Feedback on other learners’ work is encouraged by the awarding of ‘busuuberries’.

We will have to wait and see what busuu does with adaptive software and what it will do with the big data it is generating. For the moment, its interest lies in illustrating what could be done with a learning platform and adaptive software. The big ELT publishers know they have a new kind of competition and, with a lot more money to invest than busuu, we have to assume that what they will launch a few years from now will do everything that busuu does, and more. Meanwhile, busuu are working on site redesign and adaptivity. They would do well, too, to sort out their syllabus!

‘Adaptive learning’ can mean slightly different things to different people. According to one provider of adaptive learning software (Smart Sparrow https://www.smartsparrow.com/adaptive-elearning), it is ‘an online learning and teaching medium that uses an Intelligent Tutoring System to adapt online learning to the student’s level of knowledge. Adaptive eLearning provides students with customised educational content and the unique feedback that they need, when they need it.’ Essentially, it is software that analyzes the work that a student is doing online, and tailors further learning tasks to the individual learner’s needs (as analyzed by the software).

A relatively simple example of adaptive language learning is Duolingo, a free online service that currently offers seven languages, including English (www.duolingo.com/ ), with over 10 million users in November 2013. Learners progress through a series of translation, dictation and multiple choice exercises that are organised into a ‘skill tree’ of vocabulary and grammar areas. Because translation plays such a central role, the program is only suitable for speakers of one of the languages on offer in combination with one of the other languages on offer. Duolingo’s own blog describes the approach in the following terms: ‘Every time you finish a Duolingo lesson, translation, test, or practice session, you provide valuable data about what you know and what you’re struggling with. Our system uses this info to plan future lessons and select translation tasks specifically for your skills and needs. Similar to how an online store uses your previous purchases to customize your shopping experience, Duolingo uses your learning history to customize your learning experience’ (http://blog.duolingo.com/post/41960192602/duolingos-data-driven-approach-to-education).duolingo skilltree

Example of a ‘skill tree’ from http://www.duolingo.com

For anyone with a background in communicative language teaching, the experience can be slightly surreal. Examples of sentences that need to be translated include: The dog eats the bird, the boy has a cow, and the fly is eating bread. The system allows you to compete and communicate with other learners, and to win points and rewards (see ‘Gamification’ next post).

Duolingo describes its crowd-sourced, free, adaptive approach as ‘pretty unique’, but uniquely unique it is not. It is essentially a kind of memory trainer, and there are a number available on the market. One of the most well-known is Cerego’s cloud-based iKnow!, which describes itself as a ‘memory management platform’. Particularly strong in Japan, corporate and individual customers pay a monthly subscription to access its English, Chinese and Japanese language programs. A free trial of some of the products is available at http://iknow.jp/  and I experimented with their ‘Erudite English’ program. This presented a series of words which included ‘defalcate’, ‘fleer’ and ‘kvetch’ through English-only definitions, followed by multiple choice and dictated gap-fill exercises. As with Duolingo, there seemed to be no obvious principle behind the choice of items, and example sentences included things like ‘Michael arrogates a slice of carrot cake, unbeknownst to his sister,’ or ‘She found a place in which to posit the flowerpot.’ Based on a user’s performance, Cerego’s algorithms decide which items will be presented, and select the frequency and timing of opportunities for review. The program can be accessed through ordinary computers, as well as iPhone and Android apps. The platform has been designed in such a way as to allow other content to be imported, and then presented and practised in a similar way.

In a similar vein, the Rosetta Stone software also uses spaced repetition to teach grammar and vocabulary. It describes its adaptive learning as ‘Adaptive Recall™’ According to their website, this provides review activities for each lesson ‘at intervals that are determined by your performance in that review. Exceed the program’s expectations for you and the review gets pushed out further. Fall short and you’ll see it sooner. The program gives you a likely date and automatically notifies you when it’s time to take the review again’. Rosetta Stone has won numerous awards and claims that over 20,000 educational institutions around the world have formed partnerships with them. These include the US military, the University of Barcelona and Harrogate Grammar school in the UK (http://www.rosettastone.co.uk/faq ).

Slightly more sophisticated than the memory-trainers described above is the GRE (the Graduate Record Examinations, a test for admission into many graduate schools in the US) online preparation program that is produced by Barron’s (www.barronstestprep.com//gre ). Although this is not an English language course, it provides a useful example of how simple adaptive learning programs can be taken a few steps further. At the time of writing, it is possible to do a free trial, and this gives a good taste of adaptive learning. Barron’s highlights the way that their software delivers individualized study programs: it is not, they say, a case of ‘one size fits all’. After entering the intended test date, the intended number of hours of study, and a simple self-evaluation of different reasoning skills, a diagnostic test completes the information required to set up a personalized ‘prep plan’. This determines the lessons you will be given. As you progress through the course, the ‘prep plan’ adapts to the work that you do, comparing your performance to other students who have taken the course. Measuring your progress and modifying your ‘skill profile’, the order of the lessons and the selection of the 1000+ practice questions can change.