What can we learn from online peer feedback?

Posted: May 23, 2020 in ed tech, Feedback, learning theory, research
Tags: , , , , , ,

I’ve long felt that the greatest value of technology in language learning is to facilitate interaction between learners, rather than interaction between learners and software. I can’t claim any originality here. Twenty years ago, Kern and Warschauer (2000) described ‘the changing nature of computer use in language teaching’, away from ‘grammar and vocabulary tutorials, drill and practice programs’, towards computer-mediated communication (CMC). This change has even been described as a paradigm shift (Ciftci & Kocoglu, 2012: 62), although I suspect that the shift has affected approaches to research much more than it has actual practices.

However, there is one application of CMC that is probably at least as widespread in actual practice as it is in the research literature: online peer feedback. Online peer feedback on writing, especially in the development of academic writing skills in higher education, is certainly very common. To a much lesser extent, online peer feedback on speaking (e.g. in audio and video blogs) has also been explored (see, for example, Yeh et al., 2019 and Rodríguez-González & Castañeda, 2018).

Peer feedback

Interest in feedback has spread widely since the publication of Hattie and Timperley’s influential ‘The Power of Feedback’, which argued that ‘feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement’ (Hattie & Timperley, 2007: 81). Peer feedback, in particular, has generated much optimism in the general educational literature as a formative practice (Double et al., 2019) because of its potential to:

  • ‘promote a sense of ownership, personal responsibility, and motivation,
  • reduce assessee anxiety and improve acceptance of negative feedback,
  • increase variety and interest, activity and interactivity, identification and bonding, self-confidence, and empathy for others’ (Topping, 1988: 256)
  • improve academic performance (Double et al., 2019).

In the literature on language learning, this enthusiasm is mirrored and peer feedback is generally recommended by both methodologists and researchers (Burkert & Wally, 2013). The reasons given, in addition to those listed above, include the following:

  • it can benefit both the receiver and the giver of feedback (Storch & Aldossary, 2019: 124),
  • it requires the givers of feedback to listen to or read attentively the language of their peers, and, in the process, may provide opportunities for them to make improvements in their own speaking and writing (Alshuraidah & Storch, 2019: 166–167,
  • it can facilitate a move away from a teacher centred classroom, and promote independent learning (and the skill of self-correction) as well as critical thinking (Hyland & Hyland, 2019: 7),
  • the target reader is an important consideration in any piece of writing (it is often specified in formal assessment tasks). Peer feedback may be especially helpful in developing the idea of what audience the writer is writing for (Nation, 2009: 139),
  • many learners are very receptive to peer feedback (Biber et al., 2011: 54),
  • it can reduce a teacher’s workload.

The theoretical arguments in support of peer feedback are supported to some extent by research. A recent meta-analysis found ‘an overall small to medium effect of peer assessment on academic performance’ (Double et al., 2019) in general educational settings. In language learning, ‘recent research has provided generally positive evidence to support the use of peer feedback in L2 writing classes’ (Yu & Lee, 2016: 467). However, ‘firm causal evidence is as yet unavailable’ (Yu & Lee, 2016: 466).

Online peer feedback

Taking peer feedback online would seem to offer a number of advantages over traditional face-to-face oral or written channels. These include:

  • a significant reduction of the logistical burden (Double et al.: 2019) because there are fewer constraints of time and place (Ho, 2015: 1),
  • the possibility (with many platforms) of monitoring students’ interactions more closely (DiGiovanni & Nagaswami, 2001: 268),
  • the encouragement of ‘greater and more equal member participation than face-to-face feedback’ (Yu & Lee, 2016: 469),
  • the possibility of reducing learners’ anxiety (which may be greater in face-to-face settings and / or when an immediate response to feedback is required) (Yeh et al.: 2019: 1).

Given these potential advantages, it is disappointing to find that a meta-analysis of peer assessment in general educational contexts did not find any significant difference between online and offline feedback (Double et al.:2019). Similarly, in language learning contexts, Yu & Lee (2016: 469) report that ‘there is inconclusive evidence about the impact of computer-mediated peer feedback on the quality of peer comments and text revisions’. The rest of this article is an exploration of possible reasons why online peer feedback is not more effective than it is.

The challenges of online peer feedback

Peer feedback is usually of greatest value when it focuses on the content and organization of what has been expressed. Learners, however, have a tendency to focus on formal accuracy, rather than on the communicative success (or otherwise) of their peers’ writing or speaking. Training can go a long way towards remedying this situation (Yu & Lee, 2016: 472 – 473): indeed, ‘the importance of properly training students to provide adequately useful peer comments cannot be over-emphasized’ (Bailey & Cassidy, 2018: 82). In addition, clearly organised rubrics to guide the feedback giver, such as those offered by feedback platforms like Peergrade, may also help to steer feedback in appropriate directions. There are, however, caveats which I will come on to.

A bigger problem occurs when the interaction which takes places when learners are supposedly engaged in peer feedback is completely off-task. In one analysis of students’ online discourse in two writing tasks, ‘meaning negotiation, error correction, and technical actions seldom occurred and […] social talk, task management, and content discussion predominated the chat’ (Liang, 2010: 45). One proposed solution to this is to grade peer comments: ‘reviewers will be more motivated to spend time in their peer review process if they know that their instructors will assess or even grade their comments’ (Choi, 2014: 225). Whilst this may sometimes be an effective strategy, the curtailment of social chat may actually create more problems than it solves, as we will see later.

Other challenges of peer feedback may be even less amenable to solutions. The most common problem concerns learners’ attitudes towards peer feedback: some learners are not receptive to feedback from their peers, preferring feedback from their teachers (Maas, 2017), and some learners may be reluctant to offer peer feedback for fear of giving offence. Attitudinal issues may derive from personal or cultural factors, or a combination of both. Whatever the cause, ‘interpersonal variables play a substantial role in determining the type and quality of peer assessment’ (Double et al., 2019). One proposed solution to this is to anonymise the peer feedback process, since it might be thought that this would lead to greater honesty and fewer concerns about loss of face. Research into this possibility, however, offers only very limited support: two studies out of three found little benefit of anonymity (Double et al., 2019). What is more, as with the curtailment of social chat, the practice must limit the development of the interpersonal relationship, and therefore positive pair / group dynamics (Liang, 2010: 45), that is necessary for effective collaborative work.

Towards solutions?

Online peer feedback is a form of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), and it is to research in this broader field that I will now turn. The claim that CSCL ‘can facilitate group processes and group dynamics in ways that may not be achievable in face-to-face collaboration’ (Dooly, 2007: 64) is not contentious, but, in order for this to happen, a number of ‘motivational or affective perceptions are important preconditions’ (Chen et al., 2018: 801). Collaborative learning presupposes a collaborative pattern of peer interaction, as opposed to expert-novice, dominant- dominant, dominant-passive, or passive-passive patterns (Yu & Lee, 2016: 475).

Simply putting students together into pairs or groups does not guarantee collaboration. Collaboration is less likely to take place when instructional management focusses primarily on cognitive processes, and ‘socio-emotional processes are ignored, neglected or forgotten […] Social interaction is equally important for affiliation, impression formation, building social relationships and, ultimately, the development of a healthy community of learning’ (Kreijns et al., 2003: 336, 348 – 9). This can happen in all contexts, but in online environments, the problem becomes ‘more salient and critical’ (Kreijns et al., 2003: 336). This is why the curtailment of social chat, the grading of peer comments, and the provision of tight rubrics may be problematic.

There is no ‘single learning tool or strategy’ that can be deployed to address the challenges of online peer feedback and CSCL more generally (Chen et al., 2018: 833). In some cases, for personal or cultural reasons, peer feedback may simply not be a sensible option. In others, where effective online peer feedback is a reasonable target, the instructional approach must find ways to train students in the specifics of giving feedback on a peer’s work, to promote mutual support, to show how to work effectively with others, and to develop the language skills needed to do this (assuming that the target language is the language that will be used in the feedback).

So, what can we learn from looking at online peer feedback? I think it’s the same old answer: technology may confer a certain number of potential advantages, but, unfortunately, it cannot provide a ‘solution’ to complex learning issues.

 

Note: Some parts of this article first appeared in Kerr, P. (2020). Giving feedback to language learners. Part of the Cambridge Papers in ELT Series. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Available at: https://www.cambridge.org/gb/files/4415/8594/0876/Giving_Feedback_minipaper_ONLINE.pdf

 

References

Alshuraidah, A. and Storch, N. (2019). Investigating a collaborative approach to feedback. ELT Journal, 73 (2), pp. 166–174

Bailey, D. and Cassidy, R. (2018). Online Peer Feedback Tasks: Training for Improved L2 Writing Proficiency, Anxiety Reduction, and Language Learning Strategies. CALL-EJ, 20(2), pp. 70-88

Biber, D., Nekrasova, T., and Horn, B. (2011). The Effectiveness of Feedback for L1-English and L2-Writing Development: A Meta-Analysis, TOEFL iBT RR-11-05. Princeton: Educational Testing Service. Available at: https://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/RR-11-05.pdf

Burkert, A. and Wally, J. (2013). Peer-reviewing in a collaborative teaching and learning environment. In Reitbauer, M., Campbell, N., Mercer, S., Schumm Fauster, J. and Vaupetitsch, R. (Eds.) Feedback Matters. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, pp. 69–85

Chen, J., Wang, M., Kirschner, P.A. and Tsai, C.C. (2018). The role of collaboration, computer use, learning environments, and supporting strategies in CSCL: A meta-analysis. Review of Educational Research, 88 (6) (2018), pp. 799-843

Choi, J. (2014). Online Peer Discourse in a Writing Classroom. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 26 (2): pp. 217 – 231

Ciftci, H. and Kocoglu, Z. (2012). Effects of Peer E-Feedback on Turkish EFL Students’ Writing Performance. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 46 (1), pp. 61 – 84

DiGiovanni, E. and Nagaswami. G. (2001). Online peer review: an alternative to face-to-face? ELT Journal 55 (3), pp. 263 – 272

Dooly, M. (2007). Joining forces: Promoting metalinguistic awareness through computer-supported collaborative learning. Language Awareness, 16 (1), pp. 57-74

Double, K.S., McGrane, J.A. and Hopfenbeck, T.N. (2019). The Impact of Peer Assessment on Academic Performance: A Meta-analysis of Control Group Studies. Educational Psychology Review (2019)

Hattie, J. and Timperley, H. (2007). The Power of Feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77(1), pp. 81–112

Ho, M. (2015). The effects of face-to-face and computer-mediated peer review on EFL writers’ comments and revisions. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 2015, 31(1)

Hyland K. and Hyland, F. (2019). Contexts and issues in feedback on L2 writing. In Hyland K. & Hyland, F. (Eds.) Feedback in Second Language Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–22

Kern, R. and Warschauer, M. (2000). Theory and practice of network-based language teaching. In M. Warschauer and R. Kern (eds) Network-Based Language Teaching: Concepts and Practice. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1 – 19

Kreijns, K., Kirschner, P. A. and Jochems, W. (2003). Identifying the pitfalls for social interaction in computer-supported collaborative learning environments: a review of the research. Computers in Human Behavior, 19(3), pp. 335-353

Liang, M. (2010). Using Synchronous Online Peer Response Groups in EFL Writing: Revision-Related Discourse. Language Learning and Technology, 14 (1), pp. 45 – 64

Maas, C. (2017). Receptivity to learner-driven feedback. ELT Journal, 71 (2), pp. 127–140

Nation, I. S. P. (2009). Teaching ESL / EFL Reading and Writing. New York: Routledge

Panadero, E. and Alqassab, M. (2019). An empirical review of anonymity effects in peer assessment, peer feedback, peer review, peer evaluation and peer grading. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 1–26

Rodríguez-González, E. and Castañeda, M. E. (2018). The effects and perceptions of trained peer feedback in L2 speaking: impact on revision and speaking quality, Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 12 (2), pp. 120-136, DOI: 10.1080/17501229.2015.1108978

Storch, N. and Aldossary, K. (2019). Peer Feedback: An activity theory perspective on givers’ and receivers’ stances. In Sato, M. and Loewen, S. (Eds.) Evidence-based Second Language Pedagogy. New York: Routledge, pp. 123–144

Topping, K. (1998). Peer assessment between students in colleges and universities. Review of Educational Research, 68 (3), pp. 249-276.

Yeh, H.-C., Tseng, S.-S., and Chen, Y.-S. (2019). Using Online Peer Feedback through Blogs to Promote Speaking Performance. Educational Technology & Society, 22 (1), pp. 1–14

Yu, S. and Lee, I. (2016). Peer feedback in second language writing (2005 – 2014). Language Teaching, 49 (4), pp. 461 – 493

Comments
  1. Thanks for this blog post – it is super interesting thoughts and reflections.

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